Services

Electrophysiology: Inpatient Services

Autonomic Testing
Patients with recurrent fainting spells (syncope) may be referred for Head Upright Tilt Table Testing during which one’s heart rate, heart rhythm, oxygen saturation, and blood pressure are continuously or intermittently recorded while trying to provoke a fainting spell during a prolonged stand.

Permanent Pacemaker Implantation
The treatment of slow heart rhythms (bradycardia) and/or heart muscle dysfunction occasionally results in the need for permanent pacemaker implantation. Depending on patient size and heart structure, permanent pacemakers are implanted with leads attached to either the inside (endocardial) or outside (epicardial) of the heart. To provide the best cosmetic result and maximize patient safety, all pacemaker implantations are performed with Dr. Epstein working side-by-side with Dr. Reed Quinn, Maine Medical Center’s congenital heart surgeon.

Automatic Defibrillator Implantation
Life-threatening rapid heart rhythms are frequently treated with an implantable defibrillator. Depending on patient size and heart structure, defibrillators are implanted with leads attached to either the inside (endocardial) or outside (epicardial) of the heart. To provide the best cosmetic result and maximize patient safety, all defibrillator implantations are performed with Dr. Epstein working side-by-side with Dr. Reed Quinn, Maine Medical Center’s congenital heart surgeon.

Electrophysiology Study
Electrophysiology study may be recommended for a variety of reasons including to elucidate the mechanism of a known rhythm abnormality or to assess one’s risk for a life-threatening rhythm event. The electrophysiology study may be performed with a single pacing catheter placed within the esophagus, the anatomic feeding tube that connects the mouth to the stomach (transesophageal study), or with one or more pacing catheters threaded into the heart via the veins and/or arteries (intracardiac study). One of two types of non-fluoroscopic electroanatomic mapping systems may be utilized in complex cases and/or to minimize the patient’s exposure to ionizing radiation.

Ablation
Permanent elimination (ablation) of the substrate responsible for certain rapid heart rhythms (tachycardias) can be successfully and safely performed with either heat (radiofrequency ablation) or cold (cryoablation).